Entertainment

Characters who are real “Genies of Evil” in thriller movies

Last Friday, February 19, the sour thriller Eu Me Importa debuted on Netflix. The film serves to denounce the way the law allows loopholes to be used by malicious people. However, what really catches the eye is the performance of Oscar nominated actress Rosamund Pike. In one of the best performances of her career, Pike plays the cold and calculating Marla Grayson, a character who would make even the big bad movie villains tremble at the grassroots and who might even outshine another shrewd woman on her resume, the vindictive Amy. Dunne, from Exemplary Girl (2014). Not for nothing, Pike was nominated for a Golden Globe for her new role, showing us how much she works with such characters.

Inspired by this awesome new platform launch (which if you haven’t seen it yet, drop everything and do it), and another performance to freeze the spine of this wonderful artist and under- esteemed that Pike is, we’ve decided on a new article to remember the big cold women and movie calculators that made us love them. And yes, what many would call villains. Come with us to convey this anger.

Marla Grayson (Rosamund Pike)

She was the reason for this story, so we couldn’t start other than with her. Marla Grayson has the most lined up and eye-catching costumes, a ‘rule’ Chanel haircut and a promising offering, in the suspense Eu Me Importo. What sets her apart, however, is her demeanor, poise, and great intelligence. You could even say that Marla is perhaps one of the greatest feminists in cinema. That doesn’t make her a good person though. Since his favorite pastime (and making bread / or the whole bakery) is taking advantage of the elderly, banning them, becoming their curator, and extorting them to the last penny. And the worst, all backed by law.

Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike)

The blonde actress’ two best characters in the movies aren’t, let’s say, very nice people. What sets them apart is that while Marla is guided by reason, Amy is pure emotion. Of course, this is David Fincher’s excellent thriller, Exemplary Girl (2014). Even motivated only to take revenge on her worried husband, in the worst and most complex revenge (forging her own murder and setting him up), Amy does nothing fiery, and her plans are sketched out in millimeters. In its favor, there is the capacity to improvise, to always make a plan B when the first one goes badly, to obtain even more success with its misadventures.

Suzanne Stone (Nicole Kidman)

Ambition can also be what drives a “bad genius”. Go over everything and everyone to reach your goal. Here, with this famous aspiring reporter from a small town in the film Um Sonho Sem Limites (1995), by Gus Van Sant, that’s exactly what is happening. Fame and professional success are what drives the fatal and highly manipulative blonde, who goes so far as to seduce an underage and eliminate anyone who stops her, including her own husband. Think of a female version of The Vulture (2014).

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Mavis Gary (Charlize Theron)

A malicious intellect can work even on the smallest scale, aiming for more mundane and, for many, mundane goals. This is the case of this “distraught” character played by the South African muse Charlize Theron in the great and underrated Young Adults by Jason Reitman (2011). Young successful writer Mavis Gary is not in the best shape of her personal life after her husband’s divorce. Self-centered, she hatches the “brilliant” plan to return to her hometown and resume her relationship with a sweetheart from the past. However, the subject is now happy and married as a father.

Kathryn Merteuil (Sarah Michelle Gellar)

Best role of Eternal Buffy in the cinema, the character of Second Intentions (1999) is based on the Marquesa de Merteuil, since the film is a young and modern outfit of the literary classic of Choderlos de Laclos, Dangerous Liaisons – whose adaptation the most famous to cinemas is the eponymous 1988 production with Glenn Close, Michelle Pfeiffer and John Malkovich. In this rendition, Kathryn does everything and a little more, from manipulating her half-brother, to defaming the reputation of the purest girl in high school, to teaching a classmate the language kiss. to seduce her next target.

Annie Wilkes (Kathy Bates)

Who says all evil geniuses are mentally healthy. Here we have a clear case of bipolarity that escalates into the most extreme insanity imaginable. This is what the Portuguese title Louca Obsession says (Misery, 1990). Based on a book by Stephen King without any supernatural elements, here we have one of the author’s best adaptations for film. And Annie Wilkes is one of his best characters. Here, King plays with the mythology around him and his colleagues, introducing a successful writer named Paul Sheldon (James Caan), who suffers a road accident after a snowstorm and falls under the care of the aforementioned woman, a nurse, coincidentally (or not) her number one fan. For the film, Bates won the Oscar.

Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone)

Still in the field of pearls of the 1990s, the director Paul Verhoeven, the screenwriter Joe Eszterhas and especially the muse Sharon Stone gave us as a gift one of the greatest evil geniuses in the history of cinema: the police writer Catherine Tramell pendant lights. Adept at wild and violent sex, gagging and all kinds of sadomasochism, in addition to reporting to celebrities and speaking openly, without any shame, about this type of behavior, the rich and powerful author quickly becomes the main suspect. when your exes start to appear dead with refinements of cruelty. And the worst, in a way similar to the characters described in his books. Of course, we are talking about the number one erotic thriller in cinema, Instinto Selvagem (1992). I didn’t need it, but Stone repeated the dose in 2006. Suppose that didn’t happen …

Eleanor Shaw (Meryl Streep)

Many were perhaps expecting the inclusion of Miranda Priestly, Streep’s character in The Devil Wears Prada (2006), on this list. But it turns out that Miranda isn’t technically an “evil genius” in the literal sense of the word, just a shrewd boss beyond exigency. She couldn’t kill someone to achieve her goals, for example. Or would it be? Anyway, we are sure of the character of this other character of the sacred monster Streep, in the film Under the Domain of Evil (2004), a power thirsty matriarch who commits the most heinous crimes to put her son to the power of the White house. Between her and her goal is a tormented sergeant in the armed forces experienced by Denzel Washington.

Anna Morales (Jessica Chastain)

Oscar nominated Jessica Chastain specializes in playing strong, confident, and professionally successful women, but also cold, objective and calculating women. This repertoire includes works from films such as A Hora Mais Escura (2012), Armas na Mesa (2016) and A Grande Jogada (2017). Our choice for this story, however, is for his role in director JC Chandor’s little masterpiece, The Most Violent Year (2014), which might not get the attention it deserves from the big one. public. Proving the argument is a nomination for Chastain at the 2015 Golden Globe. In the film, she is a true “Lady Macbeth”, the matriarch of a criminal family, whose husband fights with all his might, even if he has to face his wife for that, in order to make your business legitimate.

Ramona Vega (Jennifer Lopez)

Extreme deception and wit can be used as evil genius, depending on what you do with it. Based on a true story, mid-50s Latin muse Jennifer Lopez lives with stripper Ramona, who sponsors new dance pros at the club she works at. She and her “daughters” are having a good life, but when the financial crisis hits the country, it reflects on them when customers stop arriving. Using her knowledge of the “cause” in favor of the financial benefit of the “friend,” Ramona soon becomes the mind behind the elaborate punches on the stock market bigwigs. For As Golpistas (2019), many believed Lopez received his first Oscar nomination. That didn’t happen, but she was nominated for a Golden Globe.

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