Entertainment

Netflix CANCELS two series dear to the public

Netflix continues to cancel audience favorite series after just one season, disgusting streaming subscribers.

In less than seven days, the streaming canceled two series.

The first was the comedy series “The Duchess”, created by actress Katherine Ryan. The audience figures weren’t enough for the streaming platform to renew production for another year (after being watched by 10 million users in 28 days). The first and only season consisted of six episodes.

Today the broadcast canceled “ The Irregulars of Baker Street, ” an ambitious supernatural series based on Sherlock Holmes.

The series only had one season, which launched in late March.

Criticism | ‘The Baker Street Irregulars’ is a weak, predictable expansion of the Sherlock Holmes universe

When Netflix started producing original series, it was noted that the streaming giant simply renewed absolutely everything. As much as the reviews and the reactions from the public were not good, the series did not make any noise on social networks, as there was the announcement of the renewal a few months later. It was like that until the first severed heads appeared, in mid-2016: ‘Hemlock Grove’, ‘Bloodline’ and ‘Marco Polo’ paved a way that would be later with the cancellations of ‘Sense8’ and ‘The Get Down’, more popular and globalized. Since then, abrupt cancellations have become more and more common, and during the pandemic there are many.

The long list of series canceled by Netflix in 2020 may be scary at first (see here!), But what those decisions mean is less abysmal than you might think. Some of them, of course, are due to complications from the Covid-19 pandemic, but many more are part of what appears to be a restructuring of the house’s plans. And, while cancellations are always frustrating for those who are fans (I myself have been waiting for the rebirth of ‘The New Normal’ since 2013), they are part of the game and will continue to be.

So if we want to understand what Netflix’s wave of cancellations really means, there are a few important points:

The crown

No one here has a crystal ball to ‘guess’ like Netflix ‘thinks’, but a Vanity Fair report found that the platform’s equation doesn’t necessarily take into account the audience, but the number of people. new potential subscribers that a new season could generate. For this reason, a good audience is an important factor, but not the only one: you still have to take into account the presence on social networks and how this impact occurs. The fan voice might not even be bulky, but if it’s loud, it has already done the job.

It is precisely for this reason, moreover, that Netflix series tend to end with fewer seasons: a series in its fifth year would hardly attract a really large number of new subscribers to offset the expense – the exceptions. are very popular attractions, like ‘The Crown’ and ‘Stranger Things’, or the platform’s early originals, like ‘Orange Is the New Black’, ‘BoJack Horseman’ and ‘House of Cards’.

Enjoy watching:

This equation is cruel, but that’s how closed systems work: What makes Netflix profitable is the subscribers, after all.

I don’t agree with that

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, producer Alex Kurtzman (“ Star Trek: Discovery ”) said that just to process PPE (personal protective equipment) for the cast and crew, an addition varying between 300 USD and 500 USD is required. thousand per episode. Reflecting on the question, other TV producers have told Rolling Stone on condition of anonymity that Kurtzman is humble with that amount and that the total expense goes way, way beyond.

For example, more is being spent on transportation: a van that would normally carry 10 people can now only accommodate two, which means more vans, more gasoline, more drivers are needed. An episode that could be completed in 8 days will now spend at least 10, and each day more means more spending and more days paying for extras. If the protagonist in your series lives in one state and records in another, the production must bear the 14 days of isolation, adding to the amount paid an additional fee for jobs the person potentially lost during that time. All the protection around the cast should be tripled as they are the most exposed as they have to be maskless during filming. Series that operate on a tight budget could hardly afford it.

And series that don’t run on a tight budget, it’s worth mentioning, are very rare exceptions.

For attractions like ‘GLOW’ and ‘The Society’, which involve a lot of physical contact (in the case of the former) and many people on the premises (the latter), the costs are even higher as these are still factors. more delicate. . There is a huge difficulty in even starting recording safely, even during the replay.

If the sum of these factors were not sufficient to lead to cancellations and “renewals”, there is another complicating factor: the reconciliation of agendas.

When all filming was halted or postponed from March of this year, it sparked a tsunami of conflicting schedules and actors having to abandon projects because they would no longer be able to fit into them when it all came back. The USA Network miniseries “Evel”, for example, was dropped because the protagonist would be Milo Ventimiglia. The actor plans to incorporate the footage into the “This Is Us” hiatus. But during the time that was going to be that hiatus, we were at the height of Covid-19 contagions and deaths, and it was not possible for any of the series to film in an insecure manner. Now the NBC family drama has returned to filming and there is no more room on Ventimiglia’s agenda for “Evel”.

With bulky casts (like “ The Society ”) and trendy names (like “ I don’t agree with that ” – the protagonist, Sophia Lillis, already has other projects lined up), the situation becomes even more difficult to circumvent. Still, the question “but couldn’t Netflix wait?” has been asked by many, the question is not necessarily “not wanting to wait”, but there is no prediction of how long to wait. It is admittedly a difficult and sacrificing choice, but the inability to reconcile so many variations is what leads to the blame – all of this while the actors, producers, directors and writers are involved in other projects as well. The creator of ‘I don’t agree with this’, Jonathan Entwistle, has previously been chosen to create films and a TV series in a Power Rangers shared universe.

Cindy Holland (left) and Bela Bajaria (right)

More specifically, Cindy Holland’s recent departure from Netflix is ​​the third factor that helps explain what’s behind these cancellations. She was one of the veterans of the house, one of the makers of the original TV series, and the one many believed to be next after Ted Sarandos. His departure, announced at the beginning of September with the promotion of Bela Bajaria to the post of head of Global TV, was a harbinger of changes.

Holland was the person who brought some of the main series to Netflix, helmed the first originals, and been with the company since the days of DVD by mail. Streaming justified that, for what she has in mind for the future, Bajaria is adjusting better – the two until then had practically shared the same position, and leaving Holland below the hierarchy would be unthinkable.

The important detail here is that future, and Bajaria’s interview helps us understand what it is exactly. When the two leaders shared the position, the big conflict was that people were often not sure which of the two to report, but it was agreed that Holland took more care of North American productions, while Bajaria answered for worlds.

Over the past few months, what we’ve been tracking through the streaming giant’s quarterly investment reports is an ever-increasing stabilization in the number of subscribers in the US and Canada, and the recent announcement of the end of them. 30 days free for new subscribers in both countries. In other words, the company implies by this that it really does not need to make an effort to convince potential consumers in these markets, because it already dominates them.

In addition, a brief analysis is enough to understand the trend that took place: during the pandemic, and even before it, “Dark”, “Elite” and “La Casa de Papel” were the series that have become gigantic phenomena throughout. the world. There are more products of this size than the platform wants. World series, produced outside the North American axis, are cheaper and have responded better with foreign audiences. By investing in it, Netflix intends to reiterate the predominance it has elsewhere in North America, in addition to getting ahead of other streams now appearing in terms of global expansion. When Apple TV +, Disney +, HBO Max and Peacock think of producing Latin series, for example, Netflix will be light years ahead.

Elite

In summary, we have to keep in mind that every broadcaster or platform cancels series. When Netflix is ​​producing at such a high volume, it is even consistent that it also has a higher number of cancellations. It is this number that is scary. But many of the attractions canceled in 2020 have come under heavy criticism, had little impact, or a combination of the two.

What appears to be the strategy is “cancel to conquer”, with a restructuring aimed at series that reach a wider audience layer. For example, even after so many cancellations, the streaming giant has already ordered seven more Spanish productions, including films, series and documentaries, capitalizing on recent successes from Spain and betting on popularity.

If it’s the right way, only time will tell. The biggest fear is that this optic aimed at mass popularity will sacrifice the space that would have series like ‘GLOW’, ‘Bounty Hunters’, ‘One Day at a Time’, ‘Dear White People’ for example – produced or played by women, black or LGBT people. In this vision that seems to be “the future of the streaming giant”, would these same series one day be produced?

Make sure to watch:

🚨 SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL 🚨http: //bit.ly/CinePOP_Inscribe

Back to top button