Entertainment

Revision | The last episodes of ‘Pose’ consecrate the series as one of the best of recent times

Warning: lots of spoilers to come.

It’s been a long journey for ‘Pose’.

The ambitious series debuted in 2018 and while it didn’t make the noise it deserved at the time, it grew to enviable popularity and swept the world with its representative messages and accurate portrayal. of the complex daily life of the LGBTQIA + community on the streets of New York in the 1980s and 1990s. Mixing the glamor and freedom of the ballroom with the growing HIV / AIDS pandemic, Ryan Murphy, teaming up to Janet Mock, Our Lady J and Brad Falchuk, built one of the most amazing and needed productions. in the history of television, in addition to opening the doors to countless transgender actresses on the mainstream scene.

Three seasons later, Murphy felt it was time to end this touching story, not ending the arc of our beloved protagonists, but closing one of the chapters in their lives. And of course, the showrunner would leave no end, on the contrary, he would build a kind of foundation for future generations who could find this pearl of audiovisual scope. In a very metalinguistic movement, the farewell messages are corroborated by an optimism that has not been with the characters for a long time, since, assuming queer in an extremely prejudiced society, they were subjected to the most reprehensible forms of labor in order to survive. , at least until they meet in the Houses.

When analyzing the deep opposition between the pilot episode and the final series, the most developed aspect is the personality of the characters involved and the way they have faced the most diverse obstacles to triumph. Blanca (Mj Rodriguez) and Pray Tell (Billy Porter), two unmatched and dream-filled forces, despite the marked difference in age and experience, come together for the last time to show the world that prosperity and the will to living are far greater than adversity – and, in a final act of kindness, Pray Tell realizes he’s accomplished everything he wanted and transferred what he has to keep Ricky’s joviality intact. (Dyllón Burnside) and allow him to have a prosperous future, even if he lives with a deadly virus.

Bringing all the best to the last two chapters, director Steven Canals has achieved the impossible and has summed up as cohesively as possible each of the connections made over the years. That’s why, because it’s a resolution, melodramatic assaults might have a greater presence, but they don’t – and, even if they were, mistakes are easily forgiven by performances. roaring cast. Pray Tell’s death, which translates into a poetic farewell letter and a final political act in the face of the government’s neglect of the LGBTQIA + community, is filled with nostalgia and celebration to honor the legacy of such an important man than him. However, Canals does not resort to the usual flashbacks to remember it, but to its materialization in the present tense and in the last dance that ties the iteration together.

Even though the tragic event is the basis of the final plot, nothing is left out or forgotten. While the previous episodes followed an anthological pattern, the lines converge at the same point where Elektra (Dominique Jackson), Angel (Indya Moore), Papi (Angel Bismark Curiel), Lulu (Hailie Sahar) and so many others enjoy feelings. similar without losing what makes them so different. What’s interesting is that none of them get carried away by toxic or dominating grief, taking advantage of everything that has happened to realize that they have fought for everything. they have and that now is the time to give back to those who were abandoned by their families and found themselves lost in the cold streets of New York.

If the aesthetic efforts are perfect without wanting to dare more than they can, the refined techniques employed by Canals and its team deserve to be recognized. Compared to the beginning of the saga, the dazzling and vibrant color palette has sometimes tinted the canvases with a frenzied profusion of sequins, dance steps and flashy costumes that caused an intense sensory explosion; now everything continues, but with a sobriety that accompanies the maturity of the characters without forgetting the artistic refuge they created to save themselves and find themselves in the midst of so much hatred – with an emphasis on the work of Simon Dennis and Nelson Cragg in a progressive and stunning photograph.

‘Pose’ ends in a way that was long overdue and, for that reason, perfectly successful. Of course, the assaults extended to each of the figures that fueled our dreams and captivated us; but, in the end, it was Blanca who needed a closure that would put her in front of a mirror and make her think: “we did it”.

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