Entertainment

The month of horror | Top 5 Best Full Moon Features Studio Movies – B Cinema Specialist

Producer is one of the references of Terror B

The field of low budget horror films is large enough to withstand some interesting competition. Among them, Hammer is the most iconic and the one who has truly had commercial control of this market for some time; even so, the ease of producing this type of work (where the costs are usually relatively low) prompts many aspirants to launch their own projects.

Full Moon Features, founded in 1988, is one of them. She, who started shortly after the failure of its founder, Charles Band’s last venture, quickly specialized in genres such as horror and science fiction; something pretty obvious when you see that a lot of his work, as well as Band’s old studio, adapted material written by HP Lovecraft (the father of cosmic terror).

Another interesting strategy of the company was to sign a distribution contract with Paramount, that way they would have the autonomy to produce films at the lowest possible cost, while the Hollywood giant would only be concerned with the sale of films. VHS movies.

That said, it’s no exaggeration to think that Full Moon tried to get its fair share of franchises, especially after their first project in 1989 was also their biggest hit of all time. With that in mind, here are five films that, despite their technical quality, marked the studio’s name in Horror B.

Around 1995, the situation was not very positive for the company. Paramount had decided not to renew the VHS distribution agreement, which in this case gave Full Moon responsibility for both producing and now selling the films. The idea to develop Inheritance Maldita came from director Stuart Gordon, who saw a poster in Band’s room with the aforementioned title and when he asked the boss about what it was, he heard the response that it was. was just a poster.

Enjoy watching:

The film is not afraid to assume the canastrice.

This situation perfectly illustrates something recurring at Full Moon: Many of the films she produced came after her posters were ready, so the plot produced was built around the extravagant look of these advertising pieces. Gordon (a seasoned studio employee) was given full autonomy to develop something for this poster, but with a budget of $ 500,000.

What was created was an adaptation of one of Lovecraft’s short stories, titled The Outsider, about a family inheriting a castle in Italy and going to visit it; as is common in the haunted house subgenre, bad things start to happen. An interesting detail of the production is that this is the first horror in which an actor was given a full body prosthesis to live out one of the monsters; until then, this type of artifice was limited to certain regions such as the face or the head.

4) The dead hate the living! (2000)

Ever since George Romero produced Night of the Living Dead in the 1960s, all zombie material has been very popular and, perhaps more importantly, easy to produce. Collect a set number of extras, use open slots, and do a basic makeup process on them while keeping the camera focused on your main characters.

The controlled budget is clear on the work.

It was with this in mind that in 2000, Full Moon commissioned director Dave Parker to produce his first zombie film, granting him an “incredible” budget of $ 150,000; I see that this value is lower than what Romero had at his disposal in 1968. Also, the whole movie was shot in 10 days.

There is a famous children’s tale in America about a man made from gingerbread; the character is usually tied to the Christmas festivities, as it is a widely consumed candy during this time, but has become a recurring character in some children’s media such as cartoons.

At least it’s impossible to say he doesn’t have a personality.

Then Full Moon decided to produce a version in which he is an assassin force. The plot, clearly inspired by Toy Killer (puppet debut Chucky), features a violent criminal who is arrested after attacking a family that owns a bakery and is then sentenced to death. After his body is cremated, his ashes are sent to his mother who performs a ritual and fuses her son’s soul with a mixture of ginger.

The mother then leaves these ingredients, anonymously, to the family who were previously victimized by her child and, unknowingly, they use them in the preparation of a gingerbread doll, giving the antagonist the possibility of revenge. Directed by Charles Band himself, the film got two more sequels and a crossover with the all-powerful Evil Bong (he’s exactly what he looks like).

2) Sub-species: the vampire generation (1991)

Besides using killer zombies and gingerbread dolls, it’s only fair that Full Moon’s attention turned to the iconic vampires; They were also Hammer’s favorite monsters. The production is actually a series of films made between the Charles Band company and the Romanian studio Castel Film Studios.

A surprising work that stood out in the technical part.

The overall plot of the franchise has a similar premise to the Book of Dracula although ultimately the plot is taken another way. The story initially involves a former vampire who plans to transform the young protagonist into an immortal; the difference, in this situation, can be seen as the presence of the second (more sympathetic) vampire who forms with her a kind of love triangle.

The series began in 1991 and lasted until 1998, when the fourth title was released. The first American film to be shot on Romanian soil, the work differs a little from the others in Full Moon, mainly in the technical part. The special effects were based on the use of stop motion combined with computer graphics.

The studio’s biggest hit, the Toy Master franchise (the first issue of which here received the title above) was also Full Moon’s first production after its inception. Having at the time the aforementioned distribution deal with Paramount, the film also ushered in a studio trend that won’t last long; this is the exhibition of the making off of the projects.

The first copy was a great success when it was released, being highly regarded for the technical aspects and the charisma of the dangerous puppets that torment the protagonists. The work received five more direct sequels, as well as a few spinoffs, a prequel, and several comics aimed at expanding toy mythology.

Make sure you watch:

Back to top button