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Weekend tip | Marathon with 10 films with Josh Brolin

Josh Brolin is a good Hollywood actor who is usually not talked about as much as he should. Due to his brooding demeanor, he ends up being picked several times for roles in police or villainous films, but he still performs well. Yesterday, February 12, he turned 53. So the trick for this weekend is a marathon of some of the actor’s best works. Check out!

The Goonies

Not everyone can say it opened in theaters in an immortal 1980s classic directed by Richard Donner and written by Steven Spielberg, right? Josh can. In this adventure for children and adolescents, he plays Brand Walsh, the older brother of the protagonist, Mikey Walsh (Sean Astin). In the storyline, Mikey, Brand, and their friends find a map in the attic of their home and embark on an epic adventure after Willy One-Eyed Treasure. The problem is, it’s not just the kids who are after him, which will confuse him.

Where the weak have no place

The end of the 2000s was a period of great significance in Josh’s career as he started to catch some really good and bigger films on the international stage, as is the case with Where the Weaknesses Have No Time, which was nominated for eight Oscars, having won in four categories. Directed by the Cohen Brothers, the film is set in Texas in the 1980s, when violence increased exponentially. Llewelyn Moss (Brolin) is a Vietnam War veteran who finds $ 2 million at a crime scene. The money came from a cartel that hired murderer Anton Chigurh (Javier Bardem) to get it back. Thus begins a persecution of great tension and psychological terror.

Enjoy watching:

Milk: the voice of equality

Nominated for eight Oscar categories, winning two, Milk: The Voice of Equality marked Brolin’s career for providing his first Oscar nomination (Best Supporting Actor) for his role as Dan White, one of the top men. most hated in San Francisco history. The film tells the story of Harvey Milk (Sean Penn), the first openly gay man to win public office in San Francisco. He used his prestige and charisma to become one of the greatest voices in the struggle for gay rights in the United States in the 1970s.

Indomitable bravery

Nominated for 10 Oscar statuettes, Bravura Indomita is a remake of a John Wayne classic from the 1960s, but while not superior, it manages to maintain the same level of shine as the original. The film tells the story of Mattie Ross, a woman who had her father murdered by one of her contractors when she was only 14 years old. The killer, Tom Chaney (Brolin), still steals the horses and gold from Mattie’s father. Disgusted, the daughter (Hailee Steinfeld) goes after a tracker (Jeff Bridges) for helping him end Chaney’s run, showing that nothing better to bind a child to an elderly person than pure sentiment of hatred and revenge. This shoot is another partnership between Josh and the Cohen Brothers, who know how to direct the actor, making him highlight the villain without falling into the stereotypes of this type of character.

MIB – Men in Black 3

After this wave of Oscar nominees, Josh Brolin embarked on this streak for one of the most popular franchises of the late 1990s: MIB: Men in Black. The film is far from a masterpiece, but it does have a heart, which makes for a super fun popcorn adventure, with the potential to rock fans. The plot is fairly straightforward by franchise standards. An alien from the past escapes from his prison on the moon and comes to Earth to get revenge on Agent K (Tommy Lee Jones). Then he goes back in time to avoid defeat, resulting in K.’s disappearance. Agent J (Will Smith) is the only one who remembers his MIB partner. When he finds out what happened, he travels to the 1960s, where he finds a “young” version of Agent K (Josh Brolin) and must convince the suspect agent to help him save the world. and his version of the future. It’s no exaggeration to say that this movie only works for the very funny performance of Brolin, who manages to make a perfect caricature of Tommy Lee Jones. The job is done so well that you can even see traces of Tommy on Josh’s face.

Inherent dependency

This crime comedy by Paul Thomas Anderson is bizarre, yet incredibly fun, punchy, and hallucinogenic. Set in the 1970s, it tells the story of Doc (Joaquin Phoenix), a private investigator who is investigating the disappearance of his ex-girlfriend and lover during a time when psychedelia and drugs were on the rise. He progresses in the investigation with the help of several assistants, among them Bigfoot (Brolin), a cop from Los Angeles who also flirts with the performance. He’s a very crazy character and it provided one of the funniest / funniest moments in the actor’s career, which is the one above.

Sicario: No Man’s Land

Denis Villeneuve is one of the current representatives of cinema. His films are amazing, tense and very well done. And Sicario was no different. Nominated for three Oscars, the film was very inexpensive by Hollywood standards and won a lot. In the plot, Agent Kate Macer (Emily Blunt) discovers a scheme of the Sonoran Cartel. So she goes to El Paso with Alejandro Gillick (Benicio Del Toro) and supervisor Matt Graver (Brolin) to extradite one of the big names in the cartel. However, things don’t go exactly as planned and Kate finds herself embroiled in a story in which she disapproves of her companions’ attitudes and soon realizes that she can’t trust anyone. The film is full of tension and heavy scenes that confront the ethics and morals of cruel and realistic characters. It is one of Josh Brolin’s most mature works.

Hello, Caesar!

Repeating the partnership with the Cohen brothers, Josh Brolin is now the star of this politically incorrect musical about a 1950s Hollywood producer named Eddie Mannix. He rose to fame for solving several issues with important actors and names in the industry, avoiding further controversies or scandals in this cinematic medium. This time he is called upon to save a star who has been kidnapped amid the recordings of a long-awaited blockbuster. In the process, Eddie delves deep into the film’s cast, discovering a truckload of personal issues for the actors that could easily be solved by him. It’s one of those classic Cohen Brothers humor films that fans really enjoy, but can blow those unfamiliar with the directorial style a bit.

Deadpool 2

2018 has been an incredible year for Josh, who starred in no less than two superhero films that garnered excellent reviews and did more than well at the box office. One of them was Deadpool 2, which followed on from the politically incorrect Ryan Reynolds phenomenon released in 2016. In this sequel, the anti-hero tries to be an X-Men, but clearly fails to murder one. abusive employee of a young mutant in front of cameras. of the TV. He goes to jail with the boy and ends up finding out that Cable (Brolin), an assassin from the future, has gone back in time just to kill the young man, who would cause a lot of trouble growing up. Adding Josh Brolin to the cast was a masterstroke because, in addition to allowing for plenty of jokes involving the actor’s past on the pop scene, he served as a counterpoint to Deadpool’s playful and irreverent personality, because Cable is serious, dark and deep, like “A Character from DC”.

Avengers: Infinity War

The other superhero film of 2018 was Avengers: Infinity War, the first chapter in the end of the Marvel macro-saga that began ten years earlier. In the movie, Earth’s Mightiest Heroes find themselves in a battle against time to try to stop Thanos (Josh Brolin), the Mad Titan, from collecting the six Infinity Stones and using them to destroy 50% of life in the universe. Josh had made minor appearances as a villain in some Marvel productions since 2014, but this was the first time he could actually play and develop his character. Along with a near-perfect CGI, the building of Thanos came about thanks to the fantastic work of the actor, who ended up being the main protagonist of a film that had the world’s most beloved heroes.

What’s your favorite Josh Brolin movie? Tell us in the comments!

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